Friday, September 25, 2009

VEER: Showing Tonight In Wallingford



Wallingford Neighbors for Peace and Justice, “Friday Night at the Meaningful Movies”, Presents:

Film: “VEER” (98 min, Greg Fredette, 2009) …AN INTIMATE, BEHIND THE SCENES LOOK AT BICYCLE CULTURE. With Spokespeople, Cascade Bicycle Club, Bike Works, Totcycle, and others.

Veer explores America’s fast-growing bicycling culture by profiling five people whose lives are inextricably tied to bicycling and the bike-centric social groups they belong to. Portland filmmakers, Greg Fredette & Jason Turner, follow these characters over the course of a year, offering a behind-the-scenes look at their personal struggles and triumphs. Veers examine what it means to be part of a community, and how social movements are formed.

"As funky as a chrome-plated unicycle and as instructive as a Bike to Work Week seminar, this tasty slice of Pacific Northwest cycling culture should fascinate anyone who prefers life on two wheels… Portland director Greg Fredette obviously knows his audience well and packs this fascinating doc with enough bike politics, culture, anarchy, art and people-profiles to make it a must-see for anyone who cares about bikes and their ever-increasing place in our daily lives.” -Monday Magazine

Following the film, join us in a facilitated discussion on local bike culture and biking in Seattle.

When: Tonight, Friday September 25, 7:00 PM
Where: Keystone Congregational United Church of Christ, 5019 Keystone Place N., Seattle (0.4 miles west of the I-5 NE 50th St. Exit - Metro Bus Routes 16, 26 & 44)

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

great interview with Mike Creed



You can read it here at Podium Insight.

Mike Creed is famous for his coffee-spitting-funny tweets. His interview, I'm glad to say, is even funnier. Long, to be sure, but worth it.

Skip the first few questions about his experience with Rock racing (unless you care about team politics). The gold is after that.

--

Saturday, September 12, 2009

Looking at Statistics on Cycling Safety

I'm trying to get a broad view of available statistics on cycling safety, with an eye toward doing some data gathering and analysis myself, if there's enough of a gap. Could you note any published statistics or analyses you know about? Thanks.

I'm aware of:

http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/28/who-causes-cyclists-deaths/

and

http://www.kenkifer.com/bikepages/health/risks.htm (thanks, poser!)

as starting points.

Friday, September 11, 2009

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

Cross is here.

This weekend the first cyclocross races started in Seattle. Labor Day Cross was the first on the calendar. It was at the North Seatac Park.

I was not sure I was going to race until 8am the day of the race. I woke up my daughter Paulina and off we went. (the boys were too lazy) We got there in plenty of time to get signed up and take a few laps of the course. Muddy and slick and then more mud. One huge run-up that is sand and railroad tie steps.

I always make the same mistake at races, warming up too late and getting to the staging area behind 30 other guys. I was in the third row. Andy Erickson was one row behind me. About 30 seconds from the start a guy just picked his bike up and left the second row. I took his spot.

The start was uphill on moss and gravel covered asphalt. I couldn't get clipped in but sprinted anyways up to about 6th going through the start/finish line. Andy was about 3 wheels behind me.

A few guys crashed before the first set of barriers and I moved up to third, Andy still right behind me. It started to get crowded as we were going through the slower singlespeeders, especially on the long runup where I found myself pausing on each step.

On the next lap Andy disappeared from behind me and reappeared in front of me. I dropped my chain going over a log in the last half lap but didn't lose any places getting it back on and kept chasing him. In all the confusion of singlespeeders and lapped riders I didn't know who was who or what place I was any more. Turns out Andy flatted in the worst spot and had to run out of the woods to the pits ~half a lap away. A Broadmark rider helped him out with a wheel and kept him in the race.

I came in third with an average lap time of just under 8 minutes.